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Wisnia w Piwie

Kormoran: Wisnia w Piwie (Poland: Fruit: 5.2% ABV)

Visual: Lovely clear cherry red. Strawberry yogurt coloured inch of froth in a milkshake style. moderate carbonation, head leaves suds around the glass.

Nose: Initial clean lager, then cherries. Black cherry yogurt.

Body: Black cherry and glacier cherry.

Finish: Black cherry. Strawberry milkshake. Red cherry. Light clean lager air.

Conclusion: Ok, this may be short. This is basically alcoholic black cherry and cherry juice. Not really much else to add.

Ok, erm, well, this thing is a wonder on the eye. Seriously so. The head looks like mounded strawberry milkshake and the light plays though the deep red body wonderfully. The weissebrau glass seems to have definitely helped the aesthetic as well.

The fruit is fresh and sweet, though manages to keep away from being syrupy. The only real evidence of the underlying lager is in the feel and general air, it has that smooth edge drinking texture, and just some small thing of lager seems to lightly float over the other elements, hinting at a beer, but never really showing it.

Though, as I hope comes across on this blog, I am not one to decry something as “Not beer” for being different from the usual real ale, but I do like to get something out of the fact I am pouring a mild poison into my body, some extra flavour I can’t get from, say, fruit juice.

This does give a little, it is pleasant, just somewhat simple. It has none of the extra layers of the better fruit based beers, and nearly no hints of the lager. It is kind of like a not crap alcopop. Despite having tried them as a kid, I really don’t get alcopops – they seem to be for people who want to get drunk, but don’t like the taste that comes from making an alcoholic drink. It is pretty much the polar opposite of my worldview, but similarly I can’t get any outrage against them. This feels more natural than those alcopops, less sickly and sugary. So, I can see how it could definitely appeal to those who want to move onto something that tastes a bit better but without the other elements. As a beer, for me, it is not fantastic, however as just a drink it is kind of fun.

So, I would say offer it to people who like the sweeter alcohol drinks, and I’m guessing you could get a few converts, or hey, if you just want a bit of childish glee and fruit with no worries about a complex beer.

Background: Second of the Polish craft beers from Independent Spirit. Erm, not much more to say but that. So, erm, beer. Enjoy beer. Yes I do make several references to drinking as a kid. I drank from very early teens, and now I like to think I have a fairly sensible outlook on alcohol so I have no issues with that. It’s the faux “mature” culture that ties booze and getting pissed to being an adult and some messed up image of masculinity and strength that worries me.

Magic Stone Dog

Stone: Magic Rock: Brewdog: Magic Stone Dog (Scotland: Belgian Ale: 5% ABV)

Visual: Banana to gold. Small white bubbled dash of a head. Some carbonation. Hazier with the last of the bottle’s pour.

Nose: Orange peel. Light funky yeast. Soft lemon. Gingerbread. Passion fruit late on.

Body: Light prickle. Slightly sour grapes. Cheesy puffs yeastiness. Spritzy. Slight greenery hints. Dry passion fruit. Kiwi.

Finish: Cheese puffs. Spritzy first, then dry later. Coriander. Clean alcohol touch. White wine. Passion fruit. Turmeric.

Conclusion: I am 64% sure this should have a white wine barrel aged variant. Ok, admittedly that is barely above average certainty, but both white wine barrel ageing, and light beer barrel ageing can be a bit of a shot in the dark. For example Everyday Anarchy did not feel like it benefited much from the wood. However, here, this beer not only distinctly calls to its two inspirational elements, that of a rustic saison and a hoppy pale ale, but it also has distinct white wine like characteristics. I would just be intrigued to see what adding to that would do.

It is an interesting mix already, especially considering that my favorite saisons tend towards the hoppy end of the spectrum anyway. Here however it uses the hops differently, giving more soft fruit from the American hops, though often in a drier style than usual. The saison funkyness is gentle, the spice similarly so. It all gives just a gentle spice warmth and a slight earthiness, along with very small greenery notes.

The wine I mentioned before shows in a spritzy clean white wine like feel, and slight sour grapes mid body, fruity but tangy.

It’s odd, all the elements are eclectic, but blended together it feels very easy to drink, and yes is very gentle. It is hard to pin down exactly – it feels very fresh up front, very dried fruit on the tongue, but finishes earthy and spiced.

For what seems to be the craft beer definition of session (because I refuse to accept any beer over 4% abv comes under an actual definition of session beer) it is a lovely session saison style beer, the flavour just never gets old because of that progression it takes.

It doesn’t win my heart in the way that Dupont or Fantome‘s Saisons have, but its twists means it is its own distinctive thing. It feels like you can have it on its own, to complement food, it is an anytime beer. Which should not be taken literally. Don’t drink and drive for one REALLY OBVIOUS EXAMPLE! But generally it is a beer you can enjoy any time you have a beer, and that is a good thing to be.

Background: Belgian Ale is such a generic beer description. This is an attempt at a mix between a saison and a Pale Ale. The guy at the bar was absolutely raving about it just before I picked this up, so I had to work hard to manage expectations. Anyway, is it just me or is the label on this very restrained for a Brewdog beer? I think it may be part of their maturing image as of late. I guess it had to come, they are the big dog of the British craft scene these days, and the rebel look doesn’t quite fit as well when you are the big dog. Still, if it is the way they are going I will miss the insane over the top labels. As always I am not an unbiased actor on Brewdog beers. This was drunk at Brewdog Bristol whilst waiting for mates to turn up.

Speyburn 10

Speyburn: 10 Year (Scottish highland single malt whisky: 10 Year: 40% ABV)

Visual: Light grain gold.

Viscosity: Quite slow but thick streaks.

Nose: Heather. Floral. Rose wine. Pencil shavings. Cake sponge. With water cereal grains.

Body: Soft. Vanilla. Cake sponge. Heather. Earthy touch. Cereal grains. Husked grains. Custard. Lime sorbet. Even softer with water, more cake and now a cream centre. Maybe a touch of jam with it.

Finish: Slightly earthy touch. Clean alcohol touch. Malt chocolate. Heather. Orange crème. Oddly slightly bigger with water.

Conclusion: Is it actually ironic when a whisky named “Burn” is actually really soft or is it just Alanis Morissette Ironic?

Either way this is gently sweet, with a slight earthy and fields like touch. Mildly rougher on the way out than when it comes in, but not massively so.

It is quite a neutral whisky, slight cake sponge, vanilla and such, with a bit of cereal like character coming out with water. It has a kind of cereal grain texture almost as it goes along the tongue, though never a roughness. It is a pleasant whisky, but not one I overly remember when I am done drinking it. There is a certain element of rustic charm, of fields and earth, but they are at the very edge against the sweetness.

Again it is one of those whiskies that I feel is well designed for people who aren’t me. It is a whisky of gentle days and long time sipping, refilling the glass over and over, as you watch the day while away. To be enjoyed by the session, not by the measure.

For my taste it feels like the base of a whisky, rather than a full whisky itself. It is the starting point you add elements to. It does however nicely encapsulate that whisky character in a smooth and easy going way.

So a gentle whisky, and not badly made, however it doesn’t fall under I style I overly appreciate, so I do not feel qualified to say if fans of softer whisky will enjoy it. For me it is a moment spent, not painfully, but not memorably either.

Background: So, my attempt to try a whisky from every active distillery in Scotland continues. Now with Speyburn. Technically I had tried them before at a few whisky festivals, but they tended to be quite late on in the proceedings, so probably didn’t show them in the best light. This was picked up as part of a three pack in Independent Spirit. I drank this while listening to some of the “Useless Trinkets” album from The Eels. I had seen the Eels live a few weeks back and was enjoying this B sides and oddities album.

Kormoran Krzepkie

Kormoran: Krzepkie (Poland: Imperial Pils: 7.4% ABV)

Visual: Yellowed gold. Large white bubbled head. Moderate carbonation.

Nose: Smooth. Crisp. Wheat hops. Soft caramel. Fresh floral lager character. Cake sponge.

Body: Smooth. Crisp lemon. Palma violet. Moderate hops but low bitterness. Fresh lime. Raspberry pavlova. Floral character. Small treacle like boozy back. Vanilla malt chocolate.

Finish: Custard. Palma violets. Smooth toffee. Hop oils. Some bitterness. Honeyed barley, or maybe golden syrup. Slight alcohol air.

Conclusion: Welcome to some heavy duty lager. This plays the lager style straight, no heavy hop exploration, no fruit infusions, wheat, or any other twists. Just careful brewing and patient lagering for maturation best I can tell.

It has a lovely crisp lager character and noble hop palma violet feel matched with soft toffee and custard sweetness which I take to be from the increased malt load. It gives a thick texture, matched by soft sherbet froth at the edges.

I am impressed, the sweetenss gives an almost pavlova feel at times that reminds me of Schneider and Sohns’ Hopfen-Weisse, in that element alone obviously. The other elements are noble hops pocked throughout that pushes a quality Poland lager feel, just bigger.

It is dangerously drinkable for the abv. It does have an occasional sign of alcohol, a treacle booziness mid body and a spirit air in the finish. Neither are common and they are both a minor flaw in that they mar the flavour, and a saving grace in that they remind you of the alcohol weight,

Overall it is an impressive lager, while it has a few harsh edges, the flavour and drinkability are such that I will not hold them against it. This is a big, malty sweet lager and it tries for nothing else, however it does that very well.

Background: I took a look on rate beer after drinking this, apparently they don’t rate it. collectively speaking. 24th percentile overall, 61st percentile by style, so just above average. Huh. Then again, much as I appreciate them as a reference I do have semi regular disagreements with the consensus. And that is fine, we all enjoy beer in our own way. Anyway, I went squee a bit when I heard Independent Spirit had some craft Polish beers in. It is my shame, that it all the years I have done this, I have never reviewed a Polish beer. Drank a few, but never reviewed. Poland has a great tradition of quality lagers, and now it seems the start of a craft beer scene – they do not deserve to be ignored. So I have redressed the balance with this long matured strong lager. I also gave their American IPA a try – pretty good, not world shaking, but a solid tasty IPA that can stand proud against the crowd. They also do a garlic beer – I have no idea what that is like, I am mildly nervous at the concept. Maybe that means I should try it and face my fears? Drunk while listening to Erocks awesome Sandstorm Meets Metal.

Longrow 10

Longrow: 10 Year: 1995 (Scottish Campbeltown Single Malt Whisky: 10 Years: 46% ABV)

Visual: Custard gold.

Viscosity: Moderate speed and thickness streaks.

Nose; Peat smoke. Pencil shavings. Beef slices. Oak. Water lightens to sulphur and grass.

Body: Lime jelly. Peat. Smoke and oak. Dried beef. Peppercorn. Custard sweetness. Crusty brown bread. Warming. Water makes broth like and grassy. Slight crème brulee balance against the peat. Malt chocolate.

Finish: Peppercorn. Beef slices. Light custard cream biscuits. Malt chocolate. Paprika touch. Water makes grassy, wet rocks and salt.

Conclusion: In a right and fair world I could just say “Springbank. 10 Year. But Peatier” However this is not a right and fair world. Or, more correctly, I get the feeling most of you lot would think I was cheating. So, let’s give this a go.

Taken neat, it is pretty much the essential character of a peated whisky. Smoke, beef character, light sweetness and warming. It has its own peppercorn flourish, but really it shows mainly the base element of how to make a peated whisky. It is warming but not burning, rough edged but not harsh. The additional element of the peppercorn is lovely though, that touch of spiciness, but slightly grounded. It complements the beefy main dish of the whisky.

Where it shows that Campbeltown style is when you add water. That Springbank grassiness comes out, and a touch of brown sugar or crème brulee sweetness shows deep beneath the smoke. It’s the old friend of Springbank showing it’s head. You now have a rustic, grassy character, as defining for Campbeltown as Islay has its iodine and salt sea breeze, but here in peated joy.

As everyone know, I love Springbank, and I love peat, so this is right up my street. For old times sake I have to give the nod to Springbank over this, but frankly they are both wonderful complex, warming and welcoming whisky. Try one, the other, or both, you are never let down.

Background: At the time I took the photo of this bottle I thought the 1995 labelling as a bit odd, as that would have been bottled near ten years ago. Looking online it seems to be a thing, I’ve seen a few specifically 1995 bottlings. Anyway, Longrow is Springbank’s more peaty bottling. I found this at Brewdog Bristol and used it to round off a short session.

Blitz Passion
Brewdog: Blitz: Passion (Scotland: Berliner Weisse: 2.8% ABV)

Visual: Hazy apricot. Small dust of off white bubbles. No evident carbonation.

Nose: Dried mango. Sour grapes. Stewed apricot. Acidic, with soft lemon.

Body: Fresh. Acidic apple. Passion fruit. Stewed banana. Slight chalky touch. Dried mango.

Finish: Tart apples. Soft passion fruit. Chalky and acidic mix. Dried mango.

Conclusion: My views on this changed a bit over the period of drinking, not in quality, but in style. Initially this seemed to be one of the tartest of the Blitz beers I had encountered. Quite surprisingly so as passion fruit is not something I associate with tartness. It could, of course, be that time has just eroded my memory of the sharpness of the others.

As I say, I have never associated passion fruit with tart, but here it delivers. Either that or it just doesn’t get in the way of the base berliner weisse and therefore allows it to express more of its character.

The fruit does seem to have its own separate character away from the sharpness, which seems to back this hypothesis. It is this kind of thick stewed fruit character. There is obviously passion fruit in the flavour, but also dried mango and stewed apricot characteristics. It is quite soothing in the middle of the beer, contrasting the sharp cider like introduction and exit. It is both a moment of relief and a release.

As I get used to the beer the character changes, the heavy sharpness and tartness soften significantly, making me wonder if it was just initial shock that made it seem so sour. In fact, when you get use to it, the softness of the middle becomes less a release, and more a point for greatest exploration of the flavour.

It is an interesting progression, which first wakes you up, and then soothes you down, for an always refreshing and yet surprisingly easy going drink by the end. More sessionable than you would initially think – it’s closest comparison is the Brodies vs Brewdog Berliner Weisse, but it doesn’t quite reach those high levels. The fact that it is close enough makes it something worth appreciating. Sharp, then mellow, and always very nice.

Background: I have also seen this listed as Blitz Passionfruit. No that doesn’t really make a difference but I have to put something in this section. The latest in an ongoing lien of berliner weisse beers with added fruit. So far they have been pretty good. I think I mentioned before, for ages I thought I hated berliner weisse beers as the first time I had them they made my mouth feel like pure agony. Turns out I had a cavity and pouring a quite acidic beer into that didn’t help. Anyway, I eventually realised my mistake, and now can enjoy the slightly odd style with ease. As always I am not an unbiased actor on Brewdog beers.

Cobra Zero

Coors UK: Cobra: Zero (England: Low Alcohol Lager: 0% ABV)

Visual: Pale yellow. Moderate bubbled head.

Nose: Dry cake sponge. Malt loaf. Wet cardboard. Wort.

Body: Lime. Cake sponge. Wet cardboard. Wort. Sulphur.

Finish: Cardboard. Wet air. Granite. Sulphur.

Conclusion: 3.4 seconds. That is how long this beer had me fooled. 3.4 seconds. Rounded to one decimal place. You see, despite an indifferent aroma, the first few seconds of this beer sitting on my tongue showed some appeal.

There was a Czech crisp character, a touch of lime, and hints of well used pilsner hop styling. Yeah, 3.4 seconds that lasted. Then the actual beer hit. Well, I say beer, this thing is more like the wort you get in a mash tun. Indistinct, vaguely malty and rough flavour. Here it is “backed” by the joys of wet cardboard and granite. Worse still they have another element from wort, that kind of sulphur element, here it is possibly best described as if someone just farted in your beer.

No that isn’t a compliment. Not even if you have a fart fetish.

Anyway, this shouldn’t have been a surprise to me. The rough wort character was there from first sniff, I was just trying to give it the benefit of the doubt. Giving it a chance to impress me. It didn’t.

It feels unfinished, unpleasant, and hangs around far too long. I’ve both heard and used the term “wet cardboard” before, but never as appropriately as here. It tastes bitter like chewing on bitter leaves rather than like hops, and gives nothing worth a damn past that 3.4 seconds. No it isn’t worth it for those 3.4 seconds.

It is like someone scooped unfinished wort out, then chemically extracted the alcohol, as if they were impatient to get this crap away from them as quickly as they could.

And for that alone I can’t blame them.

Background: So, I was in the supermarket. All my usual low abv beers had sold out. So, I thought I would experiment – what is the worst that could happen? Anyway, despite what I think may be Sanskrit on the bottle ( I looked up and couldn’t find an exact match but it looked close to one of the words for snake) this is brewed in the UK. I’m shocked, shocked I say. Anyway, after grabbing it I hear that apparently recent Cobra advertising has been pretty darn sexist. I’ve not managed to find the advert so I couldn’t say myself. Probably for the best, I don’t need more things to piss me off. This was drunk while listening to Bratmobile – Pottymouth. Yes I’m back on a riot girl punk kick again.

Weird Beard Boring Brown Beer Bourbon Barrel Aged

Weird Beard: Bourbon Barrel Boring Brown Beer (England: Brown Ale: 8.2% ABV)

Visual: Cloudy dark brown. Moderate beige wet bubbled head.

Nose: Citrus fresh. Roasted nuts. Malt. Sourdough. Dried apricot.

Body: Vanilla. Roasted nuts. Kiwi. Cherries. Malt chocolate. mint leafs and dough. Citrus edge. Slight alcohol burn on swallow. Toffee.

Finish: Malt chocolate. Spirit air. Bitter and charring. Prickly tingle. Bitter hops. Toffee.

Conclusion: I am a sucker for a bit of tongue in cheek. *rereads first line* Maybe I should rewrite that…nah it’ll be ok. Anyway, a barrel aged “Boring Brown Beer” that has to be…

Eh, ok, kind of dull.

Ok, that was harsh. What we have here is a brown ale. I’ll call it an American style brown ale as it seems to lean more to the malt chocolate interpretation over the slightly refreshing UK fare. The base style has been enhanced with a few soft vanilla oak aged notes, thought it doesn’t seem to be a heavy influence. The bigger alteration is the large infusion of hop bitterness. The roasted nut style it has calls a bit back to the UK style, but mainly I see USA influence.

It is ok, but I think they made a mistake with the base beer bitterness being a bit high. I get a lot of the generic hop bitterness character in the main play, but the more interesting notes are lost out at the edges.

Hmm again maybe a bit harsh there, there is a sort of mint leaf prickle very subtly done low down in the beer, and the hops do give a bit of citrus and kiwi at the edges, or so it seems. They aren’t very well pushed so it is hard to say. I think because they threw everything and the kitchen sink at the beer, I can but feel disappointed that it us just ok. Not actually really dull, but in no way lives up to its idea.

It is an ok brown ale, a bit spirity in the finish, and some of the flavours don’t mesh, but ok. There is a kind of sour dough element that just doesn’t work here, but the rest mainly holds up. Overall, probably not really worth grabbing I would say. Not bad, but you can easily find better. I still love the idea though.

Background: Ok I bought this because of the name. Ok, and because it sounded cool. Huge IBU, bourbon aged, chinook hop brown ale. Sounded fun. I really should get around to reviewing Weird Beard’s “Little Things That Kill”, which is an awesome beer. So awesome I tend not to wait until I am in a reviewing mood before drinking it. Anyway, trivia! I bumped into Bryan Spooner from Weird Beard at GBBF once. My attempts to subtly work out if he was who I thought he was resulted in him thinking I was hitting on him. So, that’s my meet the brewers tale of the day. Oh, the heat wave was back while I drunk this. Which is not nice. Drunk while listening to “Suffer” And “Recipe for Hate” from Bad Religion. “Recipe for Hate” is still probably my favourite album of BRs. Oh, also this was bought at Independent Spirit.

Wiper and True Sorachi Ace IPA

Wiper and True: India Pale Ale: Sorachi Ace (England: IPA: 7.1%)

Visual: Cloudy banana to apricot. Large tight bubbled froth head of a toffee touched hue.

Nose: Toffeeish malt. Lemon grass. Crisp hops. Bubble gum. Vanilla.

Body: Good bitterness. Greenery. Lemongrass. Tannins. Dry attenuated malt body. Sour cream. Dried apricot.

Finish: Lemongrass. Seaweed wrap. Bitter hops. Charring. Sour cream and chives. Malt chocolate. Toffee.

Conclusion: This is a pretty heavily attenuated beer by the taste of it. It reminds me as much of the style’s close cousin , the APA as it does an IPA. While, because of this, it lacks the sweetness of IPA Is Dead’s Sorachi Ace, it is probably equal in how well it manages to express the hop. Lots of lemongrass and general grassiness or greenery, along with that slight bubblegum weirdness.

There is differences in the expression, here, from the interactions with the attenuated base, it gets a slight sour cream and chives style which leaves you in shock as your dry mouth fills with this new flavour.

I do prefer the IID version, but this has a sheer balls out harshness to it that actually appeals rather than repulses. It isn’t a refreshing beer, quite the opposite, nor is it an easy drinking beer. I am however happily drinking away at it as it does horrible things to my mouth.

Maybe I’m just a masochist. Which would explain a lot. Like why I’m getting topped by a beer.

Or maybe it is just that this takes an already marmite crowd splitter of a hop and doubles down hard. For fans of sorachi ace this is harsh but fun, for people who were on the fence … well, this may not be for them. By which I mean run while you still can.

Now, there is some toffee sweetness but it gets drowned out more often than not. To my mind this is a desiccated, drying, grassy, lemon touched beer. It almost demands food accompaniment in order to contrast its uncompromising edges. While I prefer other beers, I have to respect that. Quality and full of character.

Background; You know, I can see what they are doing with the labels, having a label style by beer style rather than a different one for each beer. Makes it easy to pick out beers by style. Yeah. Great, but IT MAKES IT BLOODY HARD TO TELL WHICH BEER IS WHICH AT A GLANCE. I almost missed this, before noticing that as well as being an IPA, it was a sorachi ace IPA. I’m a big sorachi ace fan, and Wiper and True have been spot on with most of their beers. So I grabbed it. Drunk while listening to some Streets of Rage OCR Remixes. Because I never claimed not to be a geek. This was grabbed from Independent Spirit. Yes again.

Teeling Whiskey

Teeling: Small Batch Whisky (Irish Blended Whiskey: 46% ABV)

Visual: Light gold.

Viscosity: Fast thick streaks.

Nose: Raisins. Some alcohol burn. Pencil shavings. Water soothes and adds floral notes.

Body: Smooth. Pears and custard cream centres. Raisins. Dried spice. Noticeable alcohol. Plums. Oak. Glacier cherries. Water soothes and makes sweeter. Toffee. Apple comes out against darker fruit. Marzipan or maybe almonds.

Finish: Malt chocolate. Dried spice. Oak. Malt loaf. Again water soothes to add toffee and apples.

Conclusion: Thanks to the guys at Independent Spirit for introducing me to this little gem. Then again, considering they got money out of me afterwards, it probably wasn’t born of a hundred percent altruism. But still many thanks.

Now, taken neat this thing is a bit fiery, it has lots of raisins and dark fruit, and a bit of spice, but it is a bit of an effort to get to them. Nice but you struggle against the initial burn. The flavours don’t feel too heavy, but there is still a certain weight to the whisky.

Now, with water, now that is another story. With water the smoother Irish whiskey character comes into play. There’s very easy sipping toffee and custard, but bringing that out has not diminished that raisins and dark fruit character before; It still hangs on, as does the warming spice, now warming you with that character rather than alcohol burn. A satisfying improvement. You quickly realise it is a whiskey that really needs that water, but with it, it carefully straddles the line between flavour and ease of drinking. Now at a bit stronger than normal abv, it goes down way too easy with water, but always gives you a flavour experience that is worth it.

Some easy drinking whiskeys can seem slightly dull, or light, but that is not an issue here. The rum cask ageing is just what was needed, accentuating the character with dark fruit notes, but not to the degree it overwhelms. It reminds me of my now vague memories of Caribbean rum cask aged Bushmills which has not existed for many a year. In the absence of that, this makes a nice replacement.

Even neat it should not be written off, it is harsher, but has a worthy character. Harsh edged, but the flavours are slightly better defined. Quality, if harder to interrogate.

So, yes, it does suffer from grain fire, but that is easily remedied with water. It has rough edges, but I have always had a soft spot for that. At its price point this is a remarkably high quality whisky, and a distinctive mix of characteristics. For the price it is a steal

Background: This is an interesting one, lets see how much I can remember, and hopefully get right, from what I was told. Teeling came from one of the founders of a big Irish whisky company, who, on leaving, managed to take get a large selection of casks of Irish whisky. This is made from those casks, blended together, then finished in rum casks. If you are doing a thesis on this don’t quote me on that, I’m going by memory. Whisky addled memory. Anyway, I was given a sample of this at Independent Spirit, and highly enjoyed it, so I bought a bottle, and I am now reviewing it. This was drunk while Listening to Ihsahn – After, to take a short break from my recent riot girl punk kick.

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