Tag Archive: Sour Ale


To Øl: Sur Sorachi Ace (Denmark: Sour Ale: 6% ABV)

Visual: Pale lemon yellow to apricot. Very large mounded white froth head. Some carbonation.

Nose: Light cheese puffs funk and wheat. Flour. Lemongrass. Brown bread. Pepper. Bready in general.

Body: Sour. Sour dough. Lemon-juice. Lemongrass. Marshmallows. Brown bread. Dill pickles.

Finish: Flour. Cloying bitterness. Sour cream. Lemon-grass. Dill pickle. Slight charring.

Conclusion: Ok, maybe Sorachi Ace doesn’t go with everything. Which is a pity. I still hold that a single hopped Sorachi Ace barley wine would be awesome – but apparently the hop doesn’t suit a sour pale ale. Pity. Anyway, despite how I just opened the notes, this isn’t a bad beer. I just don’t think that Sorachi Ace added to it that well is all I am saying.

The base is still pretty nice – a tart sour character mixed in with a quite bready grounding. As I found with my experience with Sur Mosaic they have the base sour pale down pat – it is bit charred in the finish, which can be a flaw sometimes, but just about fits in here.

The issue then is that the lovely lemongrass, bubblegum and dill pickle flavours of Sorachi Ace kind of get lost in here – it is already quite sour lemon and slight pickle to the base so instead of the hop adding, you just end up with the vegetable kind of notes of the character, and less of the cool stuff. You still get some lemongrass, but generally what shines through here is the (admittedly good) base. The slight greenery just takes away from that. It is far from a bad beer, as To Øl know their shit – but even as a Sorachi Ace fan I have to say it doesn’t fit well here.

So, solid beer in execution of the concept – but the idea, or at least the hop choice, lets it down. Despite that I can still enjoy it for the quality of the base beer and will probably experiment with more of the sur hops range to see which hops work better.

Background: I love sorachi ace. Seriously love this weird hop. I had a very good experience with my last Sur * beer from To Øl – so this was definitely one to try. A soured pale ale, single hopped – what is not to like? Anyway, this was grabbed from Independent Spirit and drunk while putting on some heavy duty Meshuggah for enjoyment. It is worth noting there is no name on the front of this beer, just a bunch of sperm looking lines. The only place you find the name is in the description on the back. Which doesn’t seem to have been done for the rest of the range. Odd.


Crooked Stave: Petite Sour Blueberry (USA: Sour Ale: 5.5% ABV)

Visual: Dark apricot to gold with a darker reddish centre. A rim of white bubbles for a head.

Nose: Tart. Acidic cider. Brambles. Twigs. Slight sulphur. Slight bubblegum. Blueberry pie. Dried apricot.

Body: Tart. Quite dry. Slight cardboard. Sour lager characteristics. Lemon in a sherbet style. Ribena. Slight cherries.

Finish: Lemon juice. Slight oak. Dry blueberries. Slight cardboard. Lager like notes. Sour cherry sweets. Slight menthol and slight vinegar.

Conclusion: Ok, unlike a lot of sours, this really doesn’t do too well if you chill it down. While the aroma still had a lovely mix of fruit, cider acidity and light wood notes, the body initially came in very lacking when chilled. It felt like a sour lager with very little fruit character. Now, I mean the idea of doing a sour lager is an intriguing proposition, and I have no idea if it could actually work if done right – but here it was not that great, and also not what I was looking for in this beer.

There is a sherbety lemon style to the beer though, which leads into tarter lemon juice flavours – so it wasn’t entire lacking, but at this point I was feeling severely let down by the beer.

Time and warmth does bring out a bit more – some blueberry finally comes out – a bit more funk and oak as well. However this does remind me of something I touched upon recently. Often the most commonly used fruit for sours – the raspberries, cherries, etc – are picked because they work well. Blueberry isn’t super rare, but it definitely isn’t one of the standbys – and this beer feels like the reason why. There is some blueberry character to this as it warms, but even like that it doesn’t bring enough flavour to hide the soured lager like flavours below. This is especially a problem in the finish, and hurts the beer a lot. The body shows through a lot with this fruit, and it doesn’t have a a high quality enough body to make that work.

Warmed up more it does have moderate sourness, and kind of a cider character, but nowhere near enough a solid enough base to be deep and worth examining, and with not enough fruit to make that special.

A bit sub par – not terrible, but, especially considering the cost of this, you can get far better. Feels a too petite beer does this sour.

Background: Never tried any Crooked Stave – if this beer is anything to go by they tend to be quite expensive. Anyway, this was another one grabbed from Independent Spirit -other alcohol providers are available. You don’t see many blueberry sours in my experience – blackcurrant is not uncommon (or cassis I think it is called for Belgian sours) – but not blueberry, so I thought I would give it a go. Drunk while listening to some epic, over the top, theatrical metal with Evil Scarecrow!

wild-beer-co-breakfast-of-champignons

Wild Beer Co: Breakfast Of Champignons (England: Sour Ale: 4.1% ABV)

Visual: Dark apricot skin colour. Settles to a thin white head a few seconds after pouring. Some dark sediment.

Nose: Sour. Chestnuts. Lemon juice. Dry. White pepper. Slight vinous and raisins undertones and dry Madeira.

Body: Tart – tart apples. Slight chestnut. Light vinegar touch. Tart apricot notes. Slight floral notes. Generally nutty. Aniseed. Madeira. Malt chocolate. Grapes.

Finish: Lemony. Tart. Slight orange juice. Dried mushrooms. Petals.

Conclusion: OK, I am not quite sure what I was expecting from this beer. I mean, mushroom in a beer? I don’t really have much experience to extrapolate from here. No idea how it would alter the beer. Now I have it in my hands, I am still trying to work out what exactly it is I have got.

Well, what we seem to have is a lightly nutty sour ale. From my love of mushrooms in general I am happy to guess that the mushrooms provide the nuttiness. I’m going out on a limb here. Any which way. Not as wild and out there as you may expect from the beers base concept – let’s face it lambics can be slightly nutty in their sourness – so this sour ale isn’t too unusual in bringing more of that.

Generally it is a nice beer – Comes in with reasonable but not heavy sourness – more fresh than anything else for the most part – with occasional harsher vinegar notes. Gives the expected lemon and apple tart notes which become less evident as the nuttiness rises. It does have some unusual depth to it though – both on the nose and the body, just at the edges you may catch some subtle Madeira and vinous notes. Very subtle undertones, but nice to see they are there.

The tartness of the beer get soothed over time, late on you get much more predominance from the nuttiness and even some light malt chocolate merges in to give a very different beer to what you started with – though you never completely lose the tart base. It is a reasonable enough beer, but doesn’t feel too special – or even too unusual all things considered. It was an odd choice going with mushrooms as the extra ingredient, and it had resulted in the neither a terrible, nor an expectational beer – just a subtle influence on a competent sour.

Not raving, not complaining – an oddly standard sour.

Background: OK. Right. Erm. This is a beer made with mushrooms. So, yeah that is a thing. Grabbed from Independent Spirit this is a beer made with Penny Bun to be exact – a wild mushroom that mankind has yet to manage to deliberately cultivate. Which is interesting. Was a tad nervous about it after Wild Beer Co’s lobster beer didn’t work out well – but finally decided to give it a try.

green-flash-cellar-3-blanc-tarte-barrique

Green Flash: Cellar 3: Blanc Tarte Barrique (USA: Sour Ale: 4.5% ABV)

Visual: Hazy lemon juice. Thin white dash of a head.

Nose: Dry and lemony. Light pepper. Cheese puffs. Orange rind. Pomegranate. Heather and light smoke. Mild Madeira.

Body: Quite tart. Apples and tart cider. Crushed meringue. Vanilla. Passion-fruit and pomegranate. Quite smooth. Light cheddar. Lemon juice into lemon curd. Madeira cake. Tart white grapes. Subtle raisins. Dry white wine.

Finish: Sweet cider. Vinegar touched notes. Sweet meringue. Smooth Madeira. Dry oak. Light ginger. Jiff lemon. Orange juice. Tart white and red grapes.

Conclusion: On first sip I was nearly ready to, well – not write this off but, file it under the interesting cider like beer but without much depth cupboard. I have oddly specific mental cupboards. Sue me.

Damn I am glad that I took a bit more time to get to know the beer. I am doubly glad that, at 750 ml, there was plenty of time to get to know it.

Initial notes are a mix of tart apples and sweet cider – quite dry on the feel despite the sweet notes that pop up, and the vanilla contrast it holds. There is a bit more to it, a few nice fruit notes underneath. It is pretty nice at this point – not too sour, but fairly – some feel of the spice used rather than any immediate flavour, but overall refreshing.

What changes it from that level is when the more subtle notes come out. Underneath everything is a Madeira cake and raisin character, while at the high end tart grapes and white wine character make it sparkle. This takes from a good but standard beer to one that travels a journey – one that goes from dry and sparkling, through the fresh cider like notes, to subtle soothing dark fruit and wine. Never is any element isolated, each managed to bleed through slightly to the others – but each one has its time to shine and show off.

You end up with a beer with just enough acidity to hit the back of the throat and remind you, but that is as harsh as it gets. In return it gives plenty of flavour, a soothing but rich experience. The bottles says they aim for a lambic like ale, and while it does not feel overly close to that, it manages to be an excellent distinctive sour in itself.

Background: 2016, batch 1 it says. So hopefully they will do future batches of this. Drunk 2016, so without additional ageing time. Also says 14 IBU. I love it when they give you all these extra details on your beer. Anyway this is sour ale, intending to call to the lambic tradition that has *deep breath* Seville orange peel, Chinese ginger and grains of paradise – it was then aged for between 12 and 36 months in red and white wine barrels. Damn. Anyway, first time doing notes on Green Flash beer – think I have tried them on tap at Brewdog pubs before. Drunk while listening to The Prodigy – Music For Jilted generation. Going a bit old school for a while it seems. This was grabbed from Independent Spirit of Bath.


Dugges: Stillwater: The Tropic Thunder (Sweden: Sour Fruit Ale: 4.5% ABV)

Visual: Cloudy yellow to lemon juice. Thin white dash of a head.

Nose: Peach to peach melba. Very fruity.

Body: Lightly tart. Peach. Apples. Slightly chalky. Mango, Gooseberry.

Finish: Apples and peach melba. Drying yet sweet. Mango juice. Gooseberry.

Conclusion: Man, it’s going to be hard to make this anything but a short set of notes. We are in tart alcoholic fruit juice territory again. So, first up – this is very fruity indeed. Predominantly with peach melba flavours, but with tarter apples and gooseberry at the edges, and some influence from the mango showing its head from time to time. While passion fruit is listed as being used in making this I didn’t really taste any present during my time with it.

The base is fairly light on the tartness, definitely there but just a refreshing character rather than anything harsh. Just a kind of mild gooseberry character, and a slight dryness from the acidity. It is also actually slightly chalky as well late on, so it manages to head out still feeling sweet from the fruit, but grounded quite dry in the texture.

So, those are the main elements – not the best sour I have had, and not too complex, but is is definitely the most peach melba styled though. On that I will also say the aroma for that is fantastic – if the entire beer was a big as the aroma, then, simple as it is in range, I would have no hesitation in recommending it. The rest of the beer, well it is solid, nothing too challenging, but it does feel like a drier backed alcohol fruit mix and not much more than that. Not bad in any way, definitely enjoyable with the slightly sharp fruit character – but nothing really stands out apart from the unusual fruit choice.

So, yeah, I made the notes manage to last this long but that is all I have to say. Peach melba fruit sour, slight chalk back. Ok, but not more than that.

Background: Another case where a new brewery to me caught my eye, at a sour beer with unusual fruit, and at sub 5% abv it seemed a interesting and easy one to slip into the tasting note list to have. Grabbed from Independent Spirit as is becoming slightly predictable these days. There is also a similar but lower abv version of this available called Tropic Folk – I was a tad confused – the description and fruit listed were identical, with only the abv changed. Then it was pointed out that in Sweden beers above a certain abv can only be sold in government shops, which despite my recent trip to Sweden I had forgotten. So I am presuming the lower abv one is so it can be sold in grocery stores in Sweden. Drunk while listening to Prodigy: Always outnumbered, Never outgunned. Not their best album, but one I haven’t listened to for a while.

Wild Beer Co: 8 Wired: Black and Blue (England: Sour Ale: 5% ABV)

Visual: Yellow to peach hazy body with moderate white head.

Nose: Fresh and acidic. Fresh apples. Horse blankets. Peppered beef slices. Lightly salty. Flour. Light smoke.

Body: Acidic. Apples and pears. Tart. Apricot sweetness. Light vinegar notes. Fizzy. Chalk touch. Slight strawberry. Slight sulphur. Lemon.

Finish: Pineapple. Fresh. Flour touch. Slight strawberry. Slight black liquorice. Lemon.

Conclusion: Ok, hello, welcome to holographic flavour time again. For those of you not accustomed to the term (understandable as I think I am the only one who uses it this way) it is how I describe the experience with sour beers where amongst the sour flavours you suddenly get a host of unexpected flavours; Seemingly like an illusion caused by the shock to your tongue. It is a pretty cool thing and one of the things I love about sour beers.

This has pretty sharp sourness and acidity – not Cantillon level, but just a step past the level used by most sour beers, and beyond what I would imagine would be the comfort zone of people not used to them. As a result it isn’t one to use as an introduction sour – it hits the back of the throat with an acid burn and carries a light vinegar touch

There are slight rounding in characteristics, such as light flour and sulphur touches – possibly from the charred oak, or maybe not, but it does give a nice bit of contrast to the acidic apples and such like. It gives a slightly steam beer like texture to the middle, which for some reason feels kind of appropriate.

Pretty satisfying, but does feel a bit like a base beer to be worked from rather than the finished article. Once you get used to it, it taste pretty solid but no frills. The charred oak and the peppercorn are fairly subtle in their influence – definitely better than being overly dominant, but this could do with a little extra polish and piazza before being ready for the prime time.

Worth noting, though possibly, in fact probably psychosomatic – after I read the bottle and where the name came from, I got a kind of rare steak image of flavour around the acidic notes. Wonder how much of that was all in my mind. Anyway, a good sharp base – worth taking to some time to work from this.

Background: I am amused by the rainbow project – an attempt to link up British and world brewers ( this year New Zealand), give them a colour to use as inspiration ( in this case blue) and let them go hog wild on a collaboration. So, apparently inspired by black and blue streaks (because of course) this is a unhopped, non boiled sour ale that has been aged in charred bourbon casks for six months, and with green, black and white peppercorns added in. Never a boring moment. I love that Wild Beer co are bringing so much sour beer experimentation to the UK, and 8 wired is easily one of my favourite NZ brewers, so lots of hope for this one. Took my time with this one, was doing a full disk and system backup on my computer so had plenty of time to go. Drunk while listening to Iron Maiden: Book of Souls again. Had been debating with people at work who found it a very poor album. Still have to disagree, more an album experience than any individual song, which I can see would put people off, but very listenable as that. This was grabbed from the ever reliable Independent Spirit of Bath.


Tempest: Drop Kick Me Jesus (Scotland: Sour Ale: 5.2% ABV)

Visual: Clear dried banana yellow. Small white head and moderate carbonation.

Nose: Sweat peaches and musty aubergines. White grapes and grape skins. Passion fruit. Lightly sour. Nutty undertones. Pineapple.

Body: Lightly sour. Lemon juice. Sour white grapes. Sour dough. Sour cream. Lime cordial. Pineapple juice. Stodgy white bread. Bitty orange juice. Coconut.

Finish: Crusty white bread and flour. Lemon curd. Lime cordial. Pineapple juice. Orange slices.

Conclusion: Normally slightly cloying beers are quite closed in the flavours, there are exceptions but they usually take some time to open up. This one has all that cloying sour character but is very open and very fruity. Somehow the cloying character draws your mouth together before releasing you for the flavour to seep in. It feels slightly stodgy, like flour covered white bread, and that flour character matches with the tradition dryness of a pale ale to leave your mouth very dry on the way out.

Now, normally that level of dry pale ale characteristics is an issue for me – it makes beer feels somewhat desiccating and that just is not my thing. The sour note of this beer manages to counterbalance that – lots of tart fruit juice notes throughout. However it does seem to lean on the tart notes for contract, the sweeter peach notes in the aroma never really show in the body. It keeps itself attenuated, dry, but with tropical tartness.

It is unusual and pretty drinkable despite the dry notes – and also despite the sour notes it actually feels pretty gentle with low acidity and hop character. Overall it is refreshing, almost like a pina colada touched beer from all those pineapple and coconut moments. Lots of flavour to it, albeit they are all similar styled – it feels like a beer that has come a bit late in the year. It feels like a right proper summer refresher. So , pretty good, not exceptional, but pretty good.

Background: Yes I bought this solely because it is called “Drop Kick Me Jesus” as always my maturity has not risen with my years. I saw this was an Amarillo hopped pale ale and thought it could be a nice, more normal, entry to my beer notes. Turns out it is a sour pale ale. Ah well, I tried for normal, I don’t complain when I get odd. Grabbed from Independent Spirit, This was drunk while listening to Hate In The Box: Under The Ice. Think they are a fairly small band, check them out – I recommand “Electric Dolls” to start with.

Thornbridge: Love Amongst The Ruins (England: Sour Ale: 7% ABV)

Visual: Dark brown to red. Hazy thin rim of off white bubbles.

Nose: Sour cherries and sour black-cherries. Mature cheese. Red wine. Blackcurrants. Peach. Wet wood. Slight perry. Vanilla. Strawberry yogurt

Body: Brown envelopes and gum. Slight vinegar touch. Chocolate undertones. Tart raspberry. Strawberry crème and bitter chocolate. Dried banana. Pears. Soft cherries. Cake sponge. Slight tart cherries as well.

Finish: Malt chocolate. Acidic. Toffee. Cider. Strawberry crème. Cherry-aid and cherries. Perry. Muscatel cherries. Marmalade. Red wine.

Conclusion: Ok, I kind of expected more cherries in this. This being the one with cherries used to make it and all. That didn’t seem too wild a guess. Still, subtly of cherries aside, this is very similar to its sister beer before it, a fruity and sour red ale – just dealing a very different set of notes to what I expected.

It really is very similar a beer at its base (Ok that is admittedly probably because it is the same base beer, but roll with me here). It is lightly tart with that brown gummed envelope character, and very mild vinegar calls – backed by the sweet vanilla, toffee and chocolate subtle notes below the freshness.

The fruit character is the very surprising difference. The is some tart dark fruit, but there is also a real kind of pear to perry styled soft easygoing fruit character to this. The exact opposite of what I expected going in.

The more red fruit comes out later on as it warms, and, similar to its sister beer, you also get some orange fruit mixed in. A lot of the same compliments I gave Day’s Of Creation also apply here – the same refreshing acidic but smooth character. Same good use of sweet notes. Same feel of what seems like American hop character (despite the fact this is, apparently, an unhopped beer so I have been told) and the same natural fruitiness. I think I prefer Day’s Of Creation – the raspberry seemed to give the fruit a bit of a better defined character. This is softer and more soothing, with a lot going on but less immediately evident. Still a very good beer, and the softness here makes it an usual one – I’m just not quite sure why the cherries didn’t have more impact.

Any which way – Very good, but for my mind the silver award winner of Day’s of Creation takes the gold medal of my appreciation over this.

Background: I’ve had a few questions about if I would do this one since I did notes for its sister beer Day’s Of Creation. Well, here it is! Grabbed from Independent Spirit at the same time as its sister beer, this is the gold medal winner of the two! I have previously mentioned my slight distrust of such things though. To keep this distrust in its place, this was drunk while listening to the excellent album from Carcass – Surgical Steel. Songs about rotting flesh and death should help with my cynicism. This is nigh exactly the same as Day’s Of Creation – A sour red ale aged in red Burgundy Barrels, but this time with cherries instead of raspberries.

Thornbridge Days of Creation

Thornbridge: Days of Creation (England: Sour Ale: 7% ABV)

Visual: Deep caramel brown to red. Thin burgundy to white bubbled head.

Nose: Red wine. Big juicy red grapes and dry white grapes. Tangerine. Mild sulphur. Wet wood. Cake sponge. Nettles. Cherries. Grapefruit juice.

Body: Raspberries. White tart grapes. Juicy red grapes. Brown sticky gummed envelopes. Strawberry. Dry white wine. Acidic at back of the throat. Tart pineapple juice.

Finish: Cherries, strawberries and raspberry. Cherry-aid. Dry white wine. Lightly tart. Tangerines and mandarin orange. Gummed brown envelopes. Cider. Pineapple. Tropical fruit tins.

Conclusion: Ok, I was expecting this to be ok, but nowhere near its rep. Thornbidge do solid beers, but it has been a while since one of them really shook my world. I nearly didn’t buy this due to that, and its high cost.

Frickin’ love this beer. Tart without being harsh, with the only real acidic showing being as it hits the back of your throat. It shows that traditional slight gummy brown envelope red ale base, but with a bursting level of fruitiness – not just raspberry but a whole range of red fruit and orange variants amongst them. It really nails the easy drinking tartness level, making it refreshing while still distinctly showing the beer characteristics that separates it from just seeming like an alcoholic fruit drunk, then leads out into a tropical fruit finish.

It is delightfully full, smooth, and, while I’m sure it benefited from the wine barrel ageing, it is too well integrated to say where the beer ends and the ageing begins. That is a compliment by the way. The beer moves from what feels like fruity hop character, to booming kind of Flemish red sourness, to dry wine complexity, to raspberry fruitiness, and never lets an element dominate or even stand in a way where it is not intertwined with at least two other characteristics.

It can be drunk easily to refresh you, it can be sipped slowly to be appreciated. It is welcome at first taste, or after it has built up over the entire beer. This is probably one of the best UK sours I have ever had, and in fact, while it is different – smoother and fruitier, emphasising different notes – it still stands up amazing well against the best Belgian red sour beers.

I take my hand off to it*, it is bloody lovely.

Background: Ok, this is a sour red ale, aged in red burgundy barrels with raspberries, and also the silver medal winner for wood and barrel ages sour beers at the world beer cup 2016. I have to admit I tend to be a bit sceptical on awards, I have seen so many beers I don’t rate or find good but not great, win big awards. There is such a difference in peoples tastes that is to be expected though. Grabbed from Independent Spirit, at the same time as its sister beer “Love Among The Ruins”. Drunk while listening to the excellent electro-metal mashup Crossfaith again. Awesome energy live band.

* this is not a typo, only an in joke that about three people will get.

Mad Hatter Hold Yr Plums

Mad Hatter: Hold Yr Plums (England: Sour Ale: 5.3% ABV)

Visual: Hazy yellow. Massive yellowed head. Massive carbonation. Head keeps rising slowly long after being poured.

Nose: Soft yogurt. Custard cream biscuits. Plums. Gentle overall.

Body: Tart plums. Smooth character. Fig rolls. Vanilla sweetness. Sugar dusting. Tart apples. Slightly acidic. Vanilla toffee and fudge mix. Refreshing, slightly creamy. Herbs, not sure which, possibly sage like.

Finish: White bread. Fluffy feel, Tart apples. Tart plums. Raspberry. Creamy.

Conclusion: This is an oddly satisfying and gentle beer. Ok, the surprise is more the gentle than the satisfying, bit the satisfying is definitely nice to have. Anyway, yes this is tart, but not harsh at all for a sour. It is also very energetic. I poured it, then rapidly sipped off the rising froth to prevent it over pouring. Stopped, took a photo. Sipped again. Started taking notes. About a minute later I noticed it was still slowly rising and threatening to overflow. The head just seems to not want to stop rising, just slowly and steadily rise on forever.

Anyway, as mentioned before this is tart but in a soft and refreshing fashion. It is even slightly creamy in a way that is in phase with an almost, but not quite traditional vanilla toffee malt backdrop, just delivered in a tarter style. The subtle herbs here add a lovely mild spice to the middle. However, let us face it, that is not what you are wondering about with this beer. You are wondering how much this beer lets me hold its plums and how good it felt.

Yeah, it has a nice package of plums. Soft, but definitely the point of this beer. With the sweetness it can come across kinda fig roll like, but generally it is very evident for what it is and matches well against the soft body. Just deliciously drinkable dark fruit.

This is the polar opposite of those ultra dry acidic sours that are popular these days, but that isn’t said as a bad thing. It is a wonderful summer refresher, showing that you can deliver those with the darker end of the fruit scale.

Sweet, tart fruity, and with good use of the herb. Simple, summery and enjoyable. I approve.

Background: This also seems to exist as “Hold Your Plums”, just to confuse the naming convention. As demonstrated by the photo, this, eclectic spelling version does exist. Honest. This is a sour ale made with plums, rose petals, and damson. Grabbed from Independent Spirit, this one had been tempting me for a while because of its unusual nature, and I finally picked it up. Went back to some metal for listening to while drinking this one – Lamb Of God – Ashes Of The Wake. Good old angry scream music. Also I once did “Laid To Rest” on karaoke in Japan. Nearly did my throat in with the metal growl. Well worth it.

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